Boston University
Art Education



















2020 MA Thesis

Sabrina Tso




I believe in art being one of the most important classes among other core academic subjects. In addition to strengthening the knowledge of other subjects through the integration of art and creating interdisciplinary lessons with STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) or with discipline-based art education (DBAE), art develops the most important skill – creativity. It is also one of the only classes that practice strong, open-minded problem-solving that encourages emotional responses.

I worked with two incredible art teachers, Basha Goldstein-Weiss and Elizabeth Menges, during my practicums in both elementary and secondary school settings. With Basha’s K-8 art classes in William H. Lincoln School, I was able to learn and practice how she used a STEAM approach in her pedagogy by teaching both the units she developed and my own. With Elizabeth’s ‘Foundations Art’ class in Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, I was able to practice teaching high school students of varying experiences with the DBAE approach to develop skills using different mediums -- graphite, charcoal, colored pencil, acrylic, printmaking, and cardboard/paper (sculpture).


Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Cambridge, MA
Foundations Art (Grades 9-12)
Supervising Practitioner: Elizabeth Menges




Teaching Philosophy

I believe in art being one of the most important classes among other core academic subjects such as math, science, English, history, and others. In addition to strengthening the knowledge of these other subjects through the integration of art and creating interdisciplinary lessons such as STEAM or with discipline-based art education, art develops the most important skill—creativity. Art teaches the fundamentals of creativity and is a discipline that enables emotional responses. It is also one of the only classes that practice strong, open-minded, problem-solving. This open-ended approach is an essential skill for students to learn and understand, as they can transfer these skills and knowledge to their life and workplace. The demands of work and life do not have one set answer. Rather one has to value ambiguity, multiple problem-solving options, individuality, and creativity.

With the ease and availability of the Internet, students nowadays are often exposed to problems that are difficult for adults to prevent and supervise. This includes cyberbullying on social media, issues of self-esteem and confidence, caused by the bombardment of Photoshopped ideal images, the development of altered and partial identities—in virtual reality and in the physical world. Therefore, I believe by building a positive and helpful community in the classroom, my students will feel safe both emotionally and intellectually to help, receive help, and overcome their emotional hardships.

Teachers need to be very aware of the different cultures and social norms. This includes respecting how values can be conflicting among different groups. As a person who grew up with double nationalities as both Asian and Western, and attended an international school where different cultures intermixed, I am very conscious of the different values that need to co-exist. I can help students discover and rediscover their various communities—school, family, friends, cultures, and others by exposing them to various sources and not only the mainstream culture.


William H. Lincoln School

Brookline, MA
Grades K-8
Supervising Practitioner: Basha Goldstein Weiss